Kalka Devi Temple is an ancient shrine located in the heart of capital city of India. Explore more on Kalkaji Mandir of Delhi.

Kalka Devi Temple

Location: Near Lotus Temple, At Kalkaji, In South Delhi
Built in: 1764
Dedicated to: Goddess Kalka (form of Shakti)
Significance: Shrine of ancient origin
How to reach: One can easily reach Kalka Devi Temple by taking local Buses, metro, auto rickshaws or by hiring taxis from Delhi

Kalka Devi Temple is a popular and highly revered shrine of Delhi, the capital city of India. Located at Kalkaji in southern part of Delhi, Kalkaji Temple is close to the famous Lotus Temple. One can easily reach Kalkaji Mandir by taking local buses, auto-rickshaws or by hiring taxis from the city. The temple is dedicated to Kalka Devi, a form of Shakti (Power). Kalka Devi Mandir is very famous and receives plenty of devotees each and every day.

Kalka Devi is known to be one of the incarnations of Goddess Shakti (Durga). Due to this renowned temple, the area came to be called as Kalkaji. The image of the Goddess Kalka is believed to a self-manifested one. The main shrine has twelve sides, made in white marble and granite tiles. In the early 20th century, the present structure was erected by the contributions and donations made by the devotees.

On religious occasions, Kalka Devi temple is thronged by innumerable devotees that come to have a glimpse of the Goddess. It is regarded that Kalka Devi fulfills all the legible wishes of her true devotees. During the time of 'Navratris' (Mar-Apr / Sep-Oct), thousands of devotees come for the 'darshan' of the deity. For the period of nine days, a huge fair is organized in the vicinity of the temple.

Origin
Existent from past 3,000 years, Kalkaji Temple traces many legends regarding its origin. However, the oldest part of the shrine dates back to the 1764 A.D. Kalka Temple is said to have been constructed by the Maratha Rulers in the late 18th century. Kalkaji Mandir is believed to have been survived from the times of Mahabharata.

As per the folklore, the Pandavas and Kauravas had worshipped Kalka Devi during the reign of Yudhisthir. In the words of Laura Sykes, "Marathas plundered the fair at Kalka Devi, near Okhla" at some stage in the battle of 1738 with the Mughals at Talkatora. Raja Kedarnath (Peshkar of Emperor Akbar II) made some changes and additions to the original structure of Kalkaji Temple.